Argyll Marine SAC website.

Argyll Marine Special Areas of Conservation are part of the Natura 2000 network of sites established to conserve, natural habitats and species, which are rare, endangered or vulnerable in Europe. MarineSpecial Area of Conservation (SAC), Natura 2000, Sustainable development, Biodiversity, Habitats Directive, Firth of Lorn Loch Creran, Management Plan, Serpulid worm reefs, Biogenic reefs, Rocky reefs, Horse-mussel beds are all areas of focus for www.argyllmarinesac.org

There are six marine candidate Special Areas of Conservation (cSACs) in Argyll:
Firth of Lorn,

The Firth of Lorn cSAC encompasses a complex group of islands, sounds and inlets characterised by some of the strongest tidal streams in the UK. The Gulf of Corryvreckan, Bealach a’Choin Ghlais (Pass of the Grey Dogs) and the Sounds of Clachan, Cuan and Luing are some of the most outstanding tide-swept areas in the NE Atlantic. The rich diversity of the tide-swept rocky reefs makes the Firth of Lorn cSAC an excellent example of an area with this type of habitat.

Loch Creran,

Loch Creran harbours a diverse range of marine habitats and species. The site has been designated for the outstanding biogenic reefs (reefs built by living creatures) of the polychaete worm Serpula vermicularis and the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus. Loch Creran is the only place in the world where living reefs of serpulid worms occur in such abundance. Although horse mussel beds are quite common around the west coast of Scotland, they are relatively rare throughout the European Community.

Treshnish Isles,

The Treshnish Isles are a remote chain of uninhabited volcanic islands and skerries situated 3 km west of the Island of Mull. The Treshnish Isles candidate SAC area encompasses Lunga, Fladda and the Cairn na Burgh Islands and has been designated for the internationally important colony of grey seals Halichoerus grypus and the surrounding rocky reef habitat. Numerous skerries, islets and reefs occur in the channel between Lunga and Fladda and the coastline is characterised by low cliffs and steep rocky shores.

Lismore,

The low-lying island of Lismore, situated at the mouth of Loch Linnhe, is composed of the largest expanse of coastal limestone in western Scotland. The island, 16 km long and 3.2 km wide, divides outer Loch Linnhe in two with the Lynn of Morvern to the north-west and the Lynn of Lorn to the south-east. Eileanan agus Sgeirean Lios Mòr (Lismore) candidate SAC is a composite site comprising five groups of small offshore islands and skerries - Eilean na Cloiche and Eilean Dubh in the Lynn of Lorn, Eilean Gainimh off the northern tip of Lismore, and Bernera Island and Dubh Sgeir in the Lynn of Morvern.

South-East Islay Skerries

Situated at the southern end of the Sound of Jura, Islay is the most southerly of the main Inner Hebridean islands. The south-east Islay Skerries marine candidate Special Area of Conservation has been designated for its common seal Phoca vitulina colony and encompasses the offshore islands, skerries and the mainland coastline between Lagavulin Bay and Ardmore Point.

Mòine Mhór.

Designated habitats on the 835-hectare Mòine Mhór site include Atlantic salt meadow, intertidal mudflats and sands, degraded (still capable of natural regeneration) and active raised bog. The site is also designated for the species Lutra lutra (Otter) and Euphydryas aurinia (Marsh fritillary butterfly).

 

Argyll and Bute Council have taken the lead on the management of Loch Creran and the Firth of Lorn. Management of the other sites may be considered in the future.

Key areas of interest

MarineSpecial Area of Conservation (SAC) | Natura 2000 |Sustainable development | Biodiversity | Habitats Directive | Firth of Lorn | Loch Creran | Management Plan |
Serpulid worm reefs | Biogenic reefs | Rocky reefs | Horse-mussel beds |

 If you need more information about Natura 2000 you will find a very informative website at www.argyllmarinesac.org

Email:marine.natura@argyll-bute.gov.uk Web: http://www.argyllmarinesac.org

Argyll Marine SAC website.

Argyll Marine Special Areas of Conservation are part of the Natura 2000 network of sites established to conserve, natural habitats and species, which are rare, endangered or vulnerable in Europe. MarineSpecial Area of Conservation (SAC), Natura 2000, Sustainable development, Biodiversity, Habitats Directive, Firth of Lorn Loch Creran, Management Plan, Serpulid worm reefs, Biogenic reefs, Rocky reefs, Horse-mussel beds are all areas of focus for www.argyllmarinesac.org

There are six marine candidate Special Areas of Conservation (cSACs) in Argyll:
Firth of Lorn,
 

The Firth of Lorn cSAC encompasses a complex group of islands, sounds and inlets characterised by some of the strongest tidal streams in the UK. The Gulf of Corryvreckan, Bealach a’Choin Ghlais (Pass of the Grey Dogs) and the Sounds of Clachan, Cuan and Luing are some of the most outstanding tide-swept areas in the NE Atlantic. The rich diversity of the tide-swept rocky reefs makes the Firth of Lorn cSAC an excellent example of an area with this type of habitat.

Loch Creran,
 

Loch Creran harbours a diverse range of marine habitats and species. The site has been designated for the outstanding biogenic reefs (reefs built by living creatures) of the polychaete worm Serpula vermicularis and the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus. Loch Creran is the only place in the world where living reefs of serpulid worms occur in such abundance. Although horse mussel beds are quite common around the west coast of Scotland, they are relatively rare throughout the European Community.

Treshnish Isles,

 

The Treshnish Isles are a remote chain of uninhabited volcanic islands and skerries situated 3 km west of the Island of Mull. The Treshnish Isles candidate SAC area encompasses Lunga, Fladda and the Cairn na Burgh Islands and has been designated for the internationally important colony of grey seals Halichoerus grypus and the surrounding rocky reef habitat. Numerous skerries, islets and reefs occur in the channel between Lunga and Fladda and the coastline is characterised by low cliffs and steep rocky shores.

Lismore,

 

The low-lying island of Lismore, situated at the mouth of Loch Linnhe, is composed of the largest expanse of coastal limestone in western Scotland. The island, 16 km long and 3.2 km wide, divides outer Loch Linnhe in two with the Lynn of Morvern to the north-west and the Lynn of Lorn to the south-east. Eileanan agus Sgeirean Lios Mòr (Lismore) candidate SAC is a composite site comprising five groups of small offshore islands and skerries - Eilean na Cloiche and Eilean Dubh in the Lynn of Lorn, Eilean Gainimh off the northern tip of Lismore, and Bernera Island and Dubh Sgeir in the Lynn of Morvern.

South-East Islay Skerries

 

Situated at the southern end of the Sound of Jura, Islay is the most southerly of the main Inner Hebridean islands. The south-east Islay Skerries marine candidate Special Area of Conservation has been designated for its common seal Phoca vitulina colony and encompasses the offshore islands, skerries and the mainland coastline between Lagavulin Bay and Ardmore Point.

Mòine Mhór.

 

Designated habitats on the 835-hectare Mòine Mhór site include Atlantic salt meadow, intertidal mudflats and sands, degraded (still capable of natural regeneration) and active raised bog. The site is also designated for the species Lutra lutra (Otter) and Euphydryas aurinia (Marsh fritillary butterfly).

 

Argyll and Bute Council have taken the lead on the management of Loch Creran and the Firth of Lorn. Management of the other sites may be considered in the future.

Key areas of interest

MarineSpecial Area of Conservation (SAC) | Natura 2000 |Sustainable development | Biodiversity | Habitats Directive | Firth of Lorn | Loch Creran | Management Plan |
Serpulid worm reefs | Biogenic reefs | Rocky reefs | Horse-mussel beds |

 If you need more information about Natura 2000 you will find a very informative website at www.argyllmarinesac.org

Email:marine.natura@argyll-bute.gov.uk Web: http://www.argyllmarinesac.org